Levitra and the misuse of erectile dysfunction drugs

The results of a recent survey into the behavior of the young has just been published. It seems a reasonably significant percentage of young men without prescriptions are taking erectile dysfunction drugs. This is actually a part of a more general pattern of drug abuse. Thanks to decades of television ads for every major drug on the market, we have grown up with the idea all drugs are safe and always effective. Put another way, instead of respecting the power of drugs to affect the mind or body, we tend to pop them like candy, hoping for or expecting a legal high of one kind or another. The use of erectile dysfunction drugs is slightly different. It can be simple curiosity — an experiment to see if sex feels any different with a little medical boost. But more often it signals potential or actual psychological problems.

The whole point of a drug like Levitra is that it makes an erection more probable. If a man has lost his self-confidence, it’s a natural step to turn to a medication with a reputation for effectiveness. Instead of trusting the body to work naturally, it builds up psychological dependence. Sex without the confidence booster becomes increasingly impossible. Alternatively, some men may think the natural experience can be better if they just take a pill. This makes them a spectator in their own heads. The more you think about and monitor your own performance, the less exciting and natural it feels.

The other downside is that taking a drug like Levitra masks any symptoms that might show the development of heart disease. The most usual cause of erectile dysfunction is artherosclerosis, a hardening of the arteries. Detected early, treatment is easy and strokes or heart attacks are avoided. But if the drug hides the development of the problem, the first actual sign may be too late to save your life. The moral of this story is to treat the drugs with respect and not take them unless your regular physician confirms a diagnosis of erectile dysfunction.